Podcast.__init__ - Python and the people who make it great

22
Oct

Episode 80 - Python for GIS with Sean Gillies

Summary

Location is an increasingly relevant aspect of software systems as we have more internet connected devices with GPS capabilities. GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are used for processing and analyzing this data, and fortunately Python has a suite of libraries to facilitate these endeavors. This week Sean Gillies, an author and contributor of many of these tools, shares the story of his career and contributions, and the work that he is doing at MapBox.

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Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • When you're ready to launch your next project you'll need somewhere to deploy it. Check out Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for running your awesome app.
  • You'll want to make sure that your users don't have to put up with bugs, so you should use Rollbar for tracking and aggregating your application errors to find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today I'm interviewing Sean Gillies about writing Geographic Information Systems in Python.

Interview with Firstname Lastname

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • Can you start by describing what Geographic Information Systems are and what kinds of projects might take advantage of them?
  • How did you first get involved in the area of GIS and location-based computation?
  • What was the state of the Python ecosystem like for writing these kinds of applications?
  • You have created and contributed to a number of the canonical tools for building GIS systems in Python. Can you list at least some of them and describe how they fit together for different applications?
  • What are some of the unique challenges associated with trying to model geographical features in a manner that allows for effective computation?
    • How does the complexity of modeling and computation scale with increasing land area?
  • Mapping and cartography have an incredibly long history with an ever-evolving set of tools. What does our digital age bring to this time-honored discipline that was previously impossible or impractical?
  • To build accurate and effective representations of our physical world there are a number of domains involved, such as geometry and geography. What advice do you have for someone who is interested in getting started in this particular niche?
  • What level of expertise would you advise for someone who simply wants to add some location-aware features to their application?
  • I know that you joined Mapbox a little while ago. Which parts of their stack are written in Python?
  • What are the areas where Python still falls short and which languages or tools do you turn to in those cases?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
15
Oct

Episode 79 - K Lars Lohn

Summary

K Lars Lohn has had a long and varied career, spending his most recent years at Mozilla. This week he shares some of his stories about getting involved with Python, his work with Mozilla, and his inspiration for the closing keynote at PyCon US 2016. He also elaborates on the intricate mazes that he draws and his life as an organic farmer in Oregon.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a new sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we're interviewing K Lars Lohn about his career, his art, and his work with Mozilla
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Interview with K Lars Lohn

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • You have an interesting pair of articles on your website that attempt to detail how you perceive code and why you think that formatting should be configured in a manner analogous to CSS. Can you explain a bit about how your particular perception affects the way that you program?
  • On your website you have some images of incredibly detailed artwork that are actually mazes. Can you describe some of your creation process for those?
  • What is it about mazes that keeps you interested in them and how did you first start using them as a form of visual art?
  • At Mozilla you have helped to create a project called Socorro which utilizes complexity analysis for correlating stacktraces. How did you conceive of that approach to error monitoring?
  • Can you describe how Socorro is architected and how it works under the covers?
  • At this year’s PyCon US you presented the closing keynote and it was one of the most engaging talks that I’ve seen. Where did you get the inspiration for the content and the mixed media approach?
  • For anyone who hasn’t seen it, you managed to weave together a very personal story with a musical performance, and some applications of complexity analysis into a seamless experience. How much did you have to practice before you felt comfortable delivering that in front of an audience?
  • In addition to your technical career you are also very focused on living in a manner that is sustainable and in tune with your environment. What kinds of synergies and conflicts exist between your professional and personal philosophies?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
8
Oct

Episode 78 - Lorena Mesa

Summary

One of the great strengths of the Python community is the diversity of backgrounds that our practitioners come from. This week Lorena Mesa talks about how her focus on political science and civic engagement led her to a career in software engineering and data analysis. In addition to her professional career she founded the Chicago chapter of PyLadies, helps teach women and kids how to program, and was voted onto the board of the PSF.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Check out our sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our other sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we're interviewing Lorena Mesa about what inspires her in her work as a software engineer and data analyst.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Interview with Lorena Mesa

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python?
  • How did your original interests in political science and community outreach lead to your current role as a software engineer?
  • You dedicate a lot of your time to organizations that help teach programming to women and kids. What are some of the most meaningful experiences that you have been able to facilitate?
  • Can you talk a bit about your work getting the PyLadies chapter in Chicago off the ground and what the reaction has been like?
  • Now that you are a member of the board for the PSF, what are your goals in that position?
  • What is it about software development that made you want to change your career path?
  • What are some of the most interesting projects that you have worked on, whether for your employer or for fun?
  • Do you think that the bootcamp you attended did a good job of preparing you for a position in industry?
  • What is your view on the concept that software development is the modern form of literacy? Do you think that everyone should learn how to program?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
1
Oct

Episode 77 - Podbuzzz with Kyle Martin

Summary

Podcasts are becoming more popular now than they ever have been. Podbuzzz is a service for helping podcasters to track their reviews and imporove SEO to reach a wider audience. In this episode we spoke with Kyle Martin about his experience using Python to build Podbuzzz and manage it in production.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • You need a place to run your awesome new Python apps, so check out our sponsor Linode at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project.
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our next sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Kyle Martin about Podbuzzz
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Interview with Kyle Martin

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • Can you start by explaining what Podbuzz is? - Tobias
  • Why did you end up choosing Python as the language for building thx#is service? - Tobias
  • What have been the biggest engineering challenges in building Podbuzzz? - Tobias
  • How did you conceive of the idea to build Podbuzzz and what inspired you to provide it as a service? - Tobias
  • Part of the service that you are building is a widget that encourages listeners to rate a podcast on iTunes. Why is that important and what are some of the techniques that you have leveraged to determine the most effective messaging? - Tobias
  • What are some of the features that you plan on adding to your service? - Tobias
  • Do you intend to run Podbuzzz as a side project or do you envision it becoming a company with its own staff? - Tobias
  • In addition to your work with Podbuzzz as a way for podcasters to gain visibility for their shows, you're also working on an analytics platform for the same target audience. Can you explain a bit about that and the problems that you've had to overcome? - Tobias
  • What is it about podcasting that makes it hard to gain useful metrics and what is your strategy for overcoming some of those obstacles? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
25
Sep

Episode 76 - PsychoPy with Jonathan Peirce

Summary

We're delving into the complex workings of your mind this week on Podcast.__init__ with Jonathan Peirce. He tells us about how he started the PsychoPy project and how it has grown in utility and popularity over the years. We discussed the ways that it has been put to use in myriad psychological experiments, the inner workings of how to design and execute those experiments, and what is in store for its future.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Hired is sponsoring us this week. If you're looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Once you land a job you can check out our other sponsor Linode for running your awesome new Python apps. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • You want to make sure your apps are error-free so give our last sponsor, Rollbar, a look. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • By leaving a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music it becomes easier for other people to find us.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com to help us grow and connect our wonderful audience.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Jonathan Peirce about PsychoPy, an open source application for the presentation and collection of stimuli for psychological experimentation
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Hired Logo

On Hired software engineers & designers can get 5+ interview requests in a week and each offer has salary and equity upfront. With full time and contract opportunities available, users can view the offers and accept or reject them before talking to any company. Work with over 2,500 companies from startups to large public companies hailing from 12 major tech hubs in North America and Europe. Hired is totally free for users and If you get a job you’ll get a $2,000 “thank you” bonus. If you use our special link to signup, then that bonus will double to $4,000 when you accept a job. If you’re not looking for a job but know someone who is, you can refer them to Hired and get a $1,337 bonus when they accept a job.

Interview with Jonathan Peirce

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • Can you start by telling us what PsychoPy is and how the project got started? - Tobias
  • How does PsychoPy compare feature wise against some of the proprietary alternatives? - Chris
  • In the documentation you mention that this project is useful for the fields of psychophysics, cognitive neuroscience and experimental psychology. Can you provide some insight into how those disciplines differ and what constitutes an experiment? - Tobias
  • Do you find that your users who have no previous formal programming training come up to speed with PsychoPy quickly? What are some of the challenges there? -Chris
  • Can you describe the internal architecture of PsychoPy and how you approached the design? - Tobias
  • How easy is it to extend PsychoPy with new types of stimulus? - Chris
  • What are some interesting challenges you faced when implementing PsychoPy? - Chris
  • I noticed that you support a number of output data formats, including pickle. What are some of the most popular analysis tools for users of PsychoPy? - Tobias
    • Have you investigated the use of the new Feather library? - Tobias
  • How is data input typically managed? Does PsychoPy support automated readings from test equipment or is that the responsibility of those conducting the experiment? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most interesting experiments that you are aware of having been conducted using PsychoPy? - Chris
  • While reading the docs I found the page describing the integration with the OSF (Open Science Framework) for sharing and validating an experiment and the collected data with other members of the field. Can you explain why that is beneficial to the researchers and compare it with other options such as GitHub for use within the sciences? - Tobias
  • Do you have a roadmap of features that you would like to add to PsychoPy or is it largely driven by contributions from practitioners who are extending it to suit their needs? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
17
Sep

Episode 75 - Sandstorm.io with Asheesh Laroia

Summary

Sandstorm.io is an innovative platform that aims to make self-hosting applications easier and more maintainable for the average individual. This week we spoke with Asheesh Laroia about why running your own services is desirable, how they have made security a first priority, how Sandstorm is architected, and what the installation process looks like.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Rollbar. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you're looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • I would also like to mention that the organizers of PyCon Zimbabwe are looking to the global Python community for help in supporting their event. If you would like to donate the link will be in the show notes.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Asheesh Laroia about Sandstorm.io, a project that is trying to make self-hosted applications easy and secure for everyone.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Hired Logo

On Hired software engineers & designers can get 5+ interview requests in a week and each offer has salary and equity upfront. With full time and contract opportunities available, users can view the offers and accept or reject them before talking to any company. Work with over 2,500 companies from startups to large public companies hailing from 12 major tech hubs in North America and Europe. Hired is totally free for users and If you get a job you’ll get a $2,000 “thank you” bonus. If you use our special link to signup, then that bonus will double to $4,000 when you accept a job. If you’re not looking for a job but know someone who is, you can refer them to Hired and get a $1,337 bonus when they accept a job.

Interview with Asheesh Laroia

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Tobias
  • Can you start by telling everyone about the Sandstorm project and how you got involved with it? - Tobias
  • What are some of the reasons that an individual would want to self-host their own applications rather than using comparable services available through third parties? - Tobias
  • How does Sandstorm try to make the experience of hosting these various applications simple and enjoyable for the broadest variety of people? - Tobias
  • What does the system architecture for Sandstorm look like? - Tobias
  • I notice that Sandstorm requires a very recent Linux kernel version. What motivated that choice and how does it affect adoption? - Chris
  • One of the notable aspects of Sandstorm is the security model that it uses. Can you explain the capability-based authorization model and how it enables Sandstorm to ensure privacy for your users? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most difficult challenges facing you in terms of software architecture and design? - Tobias
  • What is involved in setting up your own server to run Sandstorm and what kinds of resources are required for different use cases? - Tobias
  • You have a number of different applications available for users to install. What is involved in making a project compatible with the Sandstorm runtime environment? Are there any limitations in terms of languages or application architecture for people who are targeting your platform? - Tobias
  • How much of Sandstorm is written in Python and what other languages does it use? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
10
Sep

Episode 74 - Python at Zalando

Summary

Open source has proven its value in many ways over the years. In many companies that value is purely in terms of consuming available projects and platforms. In this episode Zalando describes their recent move to creating and releasing a number of their internal projects as open source and how that has benefited their business. We also discussed how they are leveraging Python and a couple of the libraries that they have published.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • Rollbar is also sponsoring us this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you're looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Jie Bao and João Santos about their use of Python at Zalando
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

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On Hired software engineers & designers can get 5+ interview requests in a week and each offer has salary and equity upfront. With full time and contract opportunities available, users can view the offers and accept or reject them before talking to any company. Work with over 2,500 companies from startups to large public companies hailing from 12 major tech hubs in North America and Europe. Hired is totally free for users and If you get a job you’ll get a $2,000 “thank you” bonus. If you use our special link to signup, then that bonus will double to $4,000 when you accept a job. If you’re not looking for a job but know someone who is, you can refer them to Hired and get a $1,337 bonus when they accept a job.

Interview with Zalando

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Tobias
  • Can you start by telling us a bit about what Zalando does and some of the technologies that you use? - Tobias
  • What role does Python play in your environment? - Tobias
  • Is the use of Python for a particular project governed by any particular operational guidelines or is it largely a matter of developer choice? - Tobias
  • Given that you have such a variety of platforms to support, how do you architect your systems to keep them easy to maintain and reason about? - Tobias
  • One of the projects that you have open sourced is Connexion. Can you explain a bit about what that is and what it is used for at Zalando? - Tobias
  • What made you choose to standardize on Swagger/OpenAPI vs RAML or some of the other API standards? - Tobias
  • Did Connexion start its life as open source or was it extracted from another project? - Tobias
  • ExpAn is another one of your projects that is written in Python. What do you use that for? - Tobias
  • Can you describe the internal implementation of ExpAn and what it takes to get it set up? - Tobias
  • Given the potential complexity of and the need for statistical significance in the data for proper A/B testing, how did you design ExpAn to satisfy those requirements? - Tobias
  • Given the laws in Germany around digital privacy, were there any special considerations that needed to be made in the collection strategy for the data that gets used in ExpAn? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
3
Sep

Episode 73 - Alex Martelli

Summary

Alex Martelli has dedicated a large part of his career to teaching others how to work with software. He has the highest number of Python questions answered on Stack Overflow, he has written and co-written a number of books on Python, and presented innumerable times at conferences in multiple countries. We spoke to him about how he got started in software, his work with Google, and the trends in development and design patterns that are shaping modern software engineering.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a returning sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Hired is sponsoring us this week. If you're looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Alex Martelli
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I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Hired Logo

On Hired software engineers & designers can get 5+ interview requests in a week and each offer has salary and equity upfront. With full time and contract opportunities available, users can view the offers and accept or reject them before talking to any company. Work with over 2,500 companies from startups to large public companies hailing from 12 major tech hubs in North America and Europe. Hired is totally free for users and If you get a job you’ll get a $2,000 “thank you” bonus. If you use our special link to signup, then that bonus will double to $4,000 when you accept a job. If you’re not looking for a job but know someone who is, you can refer them to Hired and get a $1,337 bonus when they accept a job.

Interview with Alex Martelli

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • You have achieved a number of honors and recognitions throughout your career for significant technical achievements. What kind of learning strategies do you use to enable you to achieve mastery of technical topics? - Tobias
  • How do you keep the Python In A Nutshell book current as aspects of the core language and its libraries change? - Chris
  • You are known for your prolific contributions to Stack Overflow, particularly on topics pertaining to Python. Was that a specific goal that you had set for yourself or did it happen organically? - Tobias
  • When answering Stack Overflow questions, do you usually already know the answers or do you treat it as a learning opportunity? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most difficult Python questions that you have been faced with? - Tobias
  • You have presented quite a number of times at various Python conferences. What are some of your favorite talks? - Tobias
  • Design patterns and idiomatic code are common themes in a number of your presentations. Why is it important for developers to understand these concepts and what are some of your favorite resources on the topic? - Tobias
  • What do you see as the most influential trends in software development and design, both currently and heading into the future? - Tobias
  • As a long-time computer engineer, are there any features or ideas from other languages that you would like to see incorporated into Python?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
27
Aug

Episode 72 - Dave Beazley

Summary

Dave Beazley has been using and teaching Python since the early days of the language. He has also been instrumental in spreading the gospel of asynchronous programming and the many ways that it can improve the performance of your programs. This week I had the pleasure of speaking with him about his history with the language and some of his favorite presentations and projects.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you're looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Dave Beazley about his career with Python
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

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Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Hired Logo

On Hired software engineers & designers can get 5+ interview requests in a week and each offer has salary and equity upfront. With full time and contract opportunities available, users can view the offers and accept or reject them before talking to any company. Work with over 2,500 companies from startups to large public companies hailing from 12 major tech hubs in North America and Europe. Hired is totally free for users and If you get a job you’ll get a $2,000 “thank you” bonus. If you use our special link to signup, then that bonus will double to $4,000 when you accept a job. If you’re not looking for a job but know someone who is, you can refer them to Hired and get a $1,337 bonus when they accept a job.

Interview with Dave Beazley

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Tobias
  • How has Python and its community helped to shape your career? - Tobias
  • What are some of the major themes that you have focused on in your work? - Tobias
  • One of the things that you are known for is doing live-coding presentations, many of which are fairly advanced. What is it about that format that appeals to you? - Tobias
    • What are some of your favorite stories about a presentation that didn't quite go as planned? - Tobias
  • You have given a large number of talks at various conferences. What are some of your favorites? - Tobias
  • What impact do you think that asynchronous programming will have on the future of the Python language and ecosystem? - Tobias
  • Are there any features that you see in other languages that you would like to have incorporated in Python? - Tobias
  • On the about page for your website you talk about some of the low-level code and hardware knowledge that you picked up by working with computers as a kid. Do you think that people who are getting started with programming now are missing out by not getting exposed to the kinds of hardware and software that was present before computing became mainstream?
  • You have had the opportunity to work on a large variety of projects, both on a hobby and professional level. What are some of your favorites? - Tobias
  • What is it about Python that has managed to hold your interest for so many years? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
20
Aug

Episode 71 - GenSim with Radim Řehůřek

Summary

Being able to understand the context of a piece of text is generally thought to be the domain of human intelligence. However, topic modeling and semantic analysis can be used to allow a computer to determine whether different messages and articles are about the same thing. This week we spoke with Radim Řehůřek about his work on GenSim, which is a Python library for performing unsupervised analysis of unstructured text and applying machine learning models to the problem of natural language understanding.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit on your account.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Radim Řehůřek about Gensim, a library for topic modeling and semantic analysis of natural language.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

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Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Interview with Radim Řehůřek

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • Can you start by giving us an explanation of topic modeling and semantic analysis? - Tobias
  • What is Gensim and what inspired you to create it? - Tobias
  • What facilities does Gensim provide to simplify the work of this kind of language analysis? - Tobias
  • Can you describe the features that set it apart from other projects such as the NLTK or Spacy? - Tobias
  • What are some of the practical applications that Gensim can be used for? - Tobias
  • One of the features that stuck out to me is the fact that Gensim can process corpora on disk that would be too large to fit into memory. Can you explain some of the algorithmic work that was necessary to allow for this streaming process to be possible? - Tobias
    • Given that it can handle streams of data, could it also be used in the context of something like Spark? - Tobias
  • Gensim also supports unsupervised model building. What kinds of limitations does this have and when would you need a human in the loop? - Tobias
    • Once a model has been trained, how does it get saved and reloaded for subsequent use? - Tobias
  • What are some of the more unorthodox or interesting uses people have put Gensim to that you've heard about? - Chris
  • In addition to your work on Gensim, and partly due to its popularity, you have started a consultancy for customers who are interested in improving their data analysis capabilities. How does that feed back into Gensim? - Tobias
  • Are there any improvements in Gensim or other libraries that you have made available as a result of issues that have come up during client engagements? - Tobias
  • Is it difficult to find contributors to Gensim because of its advanced nature? - Tobias
  • Are there any resources you'd like to recommend our listeners explore to get a more in depth understanding of topic modeling and related techniques? - Chris

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
13
Aug

Episode 70 - Python on Windows with Steve Dower

Summary

In order for Python to continue to attract new users, we need to have an easy way for people to get started with it, and Windows is still the most widely used operating system among computers. Steve Dower is the build maintainer for the Windows installers of Python and this week we spoke with him about his work in that role. He told us about the changes that he has made to the installer to make it easier for new users to get started and how modern updates to the packaging ecosystem for libraries has simplified dependency management. He also told us about how the Visual Studio team is building a set of tools to make development of Python code more enjoyable and how Microsoft's adoption of open source is making Windows a more attractive platform for developers.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable.
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit on your account!
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Steve Dower about Python on Windows
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

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Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Interview with Steve Dower

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • You are currently the release manager for Python on Windows. How did you end up with that responsibility? - Tobias
  • While Python has supported Windows for a long time, the overall experience has historically been rather poor. Can you give a bit of the background of why that was and tell us about some of the work that you and others have been doing to make it better? - Tobias
  • Given that a large percentage of users are still on Windows, having a good story for getting started with Python on that platform is important for adoption of the language. What are some of the areas where the current situation needs to be improved? - Tobias
  • What is the most difficult part of building a distribution of Python for a Windows environment? Has it gotten easier in recent years? - Tobias
  • When we were speaking at PyCon you mentioned that the most frequently downloaded version of Python from the python.org site is the 32 bit version for Windows. Do you think that is an accurate and useful metric? What other statistics do you wish you could capture or improve? - Tobias
  • How does Python Tools for Visual Studio compare with other Python IDEs like Pycharm? - Chris
  • What are some unique features that Python Tools for Visual Studio offers that other tools don't? - Chris
  • Are there any compelling aspects of developing Python on Windows that could convince users on other platforms to make the switch? - Tobias
  • Could you give our listeners a whirlwind tour of the underlying implementation of PTVS? How does Visual Studio provide such in depth introspection for your Python code? - Chris

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
6
Aug

Episode 69 - PyCon Canada with Francis Deslauriers and Peter McCormick

Summary

Aside from the national Python conferences such as PyCon US and EuroPyCon there are a number of regional conferences that operate at a smaller scale to service their local communities. This week we interviewed Peter McCormick and Francis Deslauriers about their work organizing PyCon Canada to provide a venue for Canadians to talk about how they are using the language. If you happen to be near Toronto in November then you should get a ticket and help contribute to their success!

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you're looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Peter McCormick and Francis Deslauriers about their experiences organizing PyCon Canada
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

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Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Hired Logo

On Hired software engineers & designers can get 5+ interview requests in a week and each offer has salary and equity upfront. With full time and contract opportunities available, users can view the offers and accept or reject them before talking to any company. Work with over 2,500 companies from startups to large public companies hailing from 12 major tech hubs in North America and Europe. Hired is totally free for users and If you get a job you’ll get a $2,000 “thank you” bonus. If you use our special link to signup, then that bonus will double to $2,000 when you accept a job. If you’re not looking for a job but know someone who is, you can refer them to Hired and get a $1,337 bonus when they accept a job.

Interview with Peter McCormick and Francis Deslauriers

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • How did you get involved as an organizer of PyCon Canada? - Tobias
  • How does PyCon Canada, and other regional conferences, differ from PyCon US, both in terms of scale and overall experience? - Tobias
  • How do the audience and presenters differ from the US conferences? Is there perhaps a differen mix of industry versus academia, or maybe different disciplines? Chris
  • Are you thinking of trying to hold the conference in different cities across Canada, similarly to how PyCon US moves venues every two years? - Tobias
  • In addition to the national and regional conferences, there are a number of special interest Python conferences that take place (e.g. SciPy, PyData, etc.). What kind of relationship do you have with organizers of those events and how do they impact the kinds of talk submissions that you are likely to receive? - Tobias
  • There has been a lot of focus in recent years on trying to increase the diversity of conference speakers. What are some of the methods that you have used to encourage speakers of various backgrounds to submit talks? - Tobias
  • Organizing a conference involves a lot of moving parts. How do you structure the process to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for the attendees? - Tobias
  • What are some of the biggest logistical challenges you face as conference organizers? - Chris
  • Given that PyCon Canada is a regional conference, how has that affected your focus in terms of marketing and the general theme? - Tobias
  • Tell our listeners about your favorite PyCon Canada moments. - Chris
  • What has been the most surprising part of organizing the conference? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
30
Jul

Episode 68 - Test Engineering with Cris Medina

Summary

We all know that testing is an important part of software and systems development. The problem is that as our systems and applications grow, the amount of testing necessary increases at an exponential rate. Cris Medina joins us this week to talk about some of the problems and approaches associated with testing these complex systems and some of the ways that Python can help.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com
  • Hired has also returned as a sponsor this week. If you're looking for a job as a developer or designer then Hired will bring the opportunities to you. Sign up at hired.com/podcastinit to double your signing bonus.
  • The O'Reilly Velocity conference is coming to New York this September and we have a free ticket to give away. If you would like the chance to win it then just sign up for our newsletter at pythonpodcast.com
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Cris Medina about test engineering for large and complex systems.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

sentry-horizontal-black.png

Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Hired Logo

On Hired software engineers & designers can get 5+ interview requests in a week and each offer has salary and equity upfront. With full time and contract opportunities available, users can view the offers and accept or reject them before talking to any company. Work with over 2,500 companies from startups to large public companies hailing from 12 major tech hubs in North America and Europe. Hired is totally free for users and If you get a job you’ll get a $2,000 “thank you” bonus. If you use our special link to signup, then that bonus will double to $4,000 when you accept a job. If you’re not looking for a job but know someone who is, you can refer them to Hired and get a $1,337 bonus when they accept a job.

Interview with Cris Medina

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • To get us started can you share your definition of test engineering and how it differs from the types of testing that your average developer is used to? - Tobias
  • What are some common industries or situations where this kind of test engineering becomes necessary? - Tobias
  • How and where does Python fit into the kind of testing that becomes necessary when dealing with these complex systems? - Tobias
  • How do you determine which areas of a system to test and how can Python help in that discovery process? - Tobias
  • What are some of your favorite tools and libraries for this kind of work? - Tobias
  • What are some of the areas where the existing Python tooling falls short? - Tobias
  • Given the breadth of concerns that are encompassed with testing the various components of these large systems, what are some ways that a test engineer can get a high-level view of the overall state? - Tobias
    • How can that information be distilled for presentation to other areas of the business? - Tobias
    • Could that information be used to provide a compelling business case for the resources required to test properly? - Chris
  • Given the low-level nature of this kind of work I imagine that proper visibility of the work being done can be difficult. How do you make sure that management can properly see and appreciate your efforts? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
23
Jul

Episode 67 - Crossing The Streams - Talk Python with Michael Kennedy

Summary

The same week that we released our first episode of Podcast.__init__, Michael Kennedy was publishing the very first episode of Talk Python To Me. The years long drought of podcasts about Python has been quenched with a veritable flood of quality content as we have both continued to deliver the stories of the wonderful people who make our community such a wonderful place. This week we interviewed Michael about what inspired him to get started, his process and experience as Talk Python continues to evolve, and how that has led him to create online training courses alongside the podcast. He also interviewed us, so check out this weeks episode of Talk Python To Me for a mirror image of this show!

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Michael Kennedy about his work with Talk Python to Me, another podcast about Python and its community, and on-demand Python trainings. Michael has also offered to give away one of each of his Python courses to our listeners. If you would like the chance to win, then sign up for our newsletter at pythonpodcast.com, or our forum at discourse.pythonpodcast.com. If you want to double your chances, then sign up for both!
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Interview with Michael Kennedy

  • Introductions
  • How did you get into programming?
  • How did you get introduced to Python? (Chris)
  • What is the craziest piece of software you've ever written? - Tobias
  • You've taken some pretty drastic steps around Python and your career lately. What inspired you to do that and how's it going?(yes, quit my job, focus only on podcast and online courses).
  • You are basically self-taught as a developer, how did you get into this teaching / mentor role?
  • Why did you first get started with Talk Python to Me? - Tobias
  • Did you know when you started that it would turn into a full-time endeavor? - Tobias
  • For a while there weren't any podcasts available that focused on Python and now we're each producing one. What's it like to run a successful podcast? - Tobias
  • What have been your most popular episodes? Tell us a bit about each - Tobias
  • In your excellent episode with Kate Heddleston you talked about how we tend to bash other programming languages. We've done a fair bit of Java bashing here. How can we help get ourselves and others in our community out of this bad habit? - Chris
  • How do you select the guests and topics for your show? - Tobias
  • What topics do you have planned for the next few episodes?
  • How do you prepare the questions for each episode? - Tobias
  • What is the most significant thing you've learned from the podcasting experience?
  • What do you wish you did differently and how are you looking to improve? - Tobias
  • I had a great time hanging out with you at PyCon this year. What was your impression of the conference?
  • What were your favorite sessions and do you have any shows scheduled to follow up on them? - Tobias
  • Your sites are 100% "hand-crafted" as they say. Can you give us a look inside? What are the moving parts in there?
  • So you stirred things up with Stitcher this week. What's up with that?
  • Can you recommend some podcasts? What's in your playlist?
  • Final call to action?

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
17
Jul

Episode 66 - Zorg with Gunther Cox and Kevin Brown

Summary

Everyone loves to imagine what they would do if they had their own robot. This week we spoke with Gunther Cox and Kevin Brown about their work on Zorg, which is a Python library for building a robot of your own! We discussed how the project got started, what platforms it supports, and some of the projects that have been built with it. Give it a listen and then get building!

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we're interviewing Gunther Cox and Kevin Brown about Zorg, a Python framework for robotics and physical computing
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Interview with Gunther Cox and Kevin Brown

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Tobias
  • What is Zorg and what is its origin story? - Tobias
  • How would you define and differentiate the concepts of robotics, physical computing, and the internet of things? - Tobias
  • I noticed in the documentation that Zorg is based on the Cylon.js project. How closely does the implementation of Zorg stick to that of Cylon and how much needs to be changed due to differences in the language? - Tobias
  • Is Zorg useful for production applications or is it primarily intended for educational purposes and hobby projects? - Tobias
  • Zorg currently only supports the Intel Edison, with plans for Raspberry Pi and Arduino Firmata support in the works. What is involved in adding compatibility with other platforms? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most interesting projects that you have seen created using Zorg? - Tobias
  • How does Zorg compare to other Python robotics projects such as ROSPy? - Tobias
  • Robotics is a large and complex problem space. What are some of the other features and projects in Python that are often used when building robots? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
10
Jul

Episode 65 - Mypy with David Fisher and Greg Price

Summary

As Python developers we are fond of the dynamic nature of the language. Sometimes, though, it can get a bit too dynamic and that's where having some type information would come in handy. Mypy is a project that aims to add that missing level of detail to function and variable definitions so that you don't have to go hunting 5 levels deep in the stack to understand what shape that data structure is supposed to be. This week we spoke with David Fisher and Greg Price about their work on Mypy and its use within Dropbox and the broader community. They explained how it got started, how it works under the covers, and why you should consider adding it to your projects.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing David Fisher and Greg Price about Mypy, a library for adding optional static types to your Python code.
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es

Interview with David Fisher and Greg Price

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • Can you explain a bit about what Mypy is and its origin story? - Tobias
  • What are the benefits of using Mypy for both new and existing projects? - Tobias
  • How does the Mypy compilation step work? - Tobias
  • What are the biggest technical challenges in implementing Mypy? - Chris
  • Are there any limitations imposed by the syntax of Python that prevented you from implementing any features or syntax that you would have liked to include in Mypy? - Tobias
  • In Guido's keynote from this year's PyCon he mentioned some tentative plans for adding variable type declarations to the Python syntax in one of the next major releases. How much of that idea was inspired by Mypy? - Tobias
  • Type theory is a large and complex problem domain. Can you explain where Mypy falls in this space? - Tobias
  • Which language(s) had the biggest influence on the particular syntax and semantics used in Mypy? - Tobias
  • What kinds of type definitions and guarantees can be encoded using Mypy? - Tobias
  • Can you talk a bit about user defined types as implemented in Mypy? - Chris
  • How has the inclusion of the typing module in the Python standard libary influenced the evolution of Mypy? - Tobias
  • Did the inclusion of multiple inheritance add any implementation complexity to Mypy? - Chris
  • Do you know of any formal studies that have been performed to research the ergonomics or efficiency gains of static or gradual type systems? - Tobias
  • What does the future roadmap for Mypy look like? - Tobias

Keep In Touch

$ pip3 install mypy-lang

Bug reports, feature requests, questions welcome on issue tracker: github.com/python/mypy

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
2
Jul

Episode 64 - BeeWare with Russell Keith-Magee

Summary

When you have good tools it makes the work you do even more enjoyable. Russel Keith-Magee has been building up a set of tools that are aiming to let you write graphical interfaces in Python and run them across all of your target platforms. Most recently he has been working on a capstone project called Toga that targets the Android and iOS platforms with the same set of code. In this episode we explored his journey through programming and how he has built and designed the Beeware suite. Give it a listen and then try out some or all of his excellent projects!

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit to get a $50 credit!
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Russel Keith-Magee about the Beeware project, which is a collection of tools and libraries that are meant to be composed together for building up your Python development environment.
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Interview with Firstname Lastname

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • What is the BeeWare project and what goals do you have for it? - Tobias
  • What kinds of projects are contained under the BeeWare umbrella and what inspired you to start creating these kinds of tools? - Tobias
  • Did each project arise from a particular need that you had at the time or has there been a logical progression from one tool to the next? - Tobias
  • At PyCon US of this year (2016) you made a presentation about the work that you have been doing to bring Python to the iOS and Android platforms. Can you provide a high-level overview for anyone who hasn't seen that talk yet? - Tobias
  • Let's talk about Toga - how does Toga differ from some of the other cross platform UI framework efforts for various languages like Kivy or Shoes? - Chris
  • What are some of the biggest challenges that you had to overcome in order to get Python to run on both iOS and Android? - Tobias
  • How does runtime performance for applications written in Python compare with the same program running in the languages that are natively supported on those platforms? - Tobias
  • Can you walk us through the low level flow of a single toga API request? - Chris
  • Do you view your work on Toga and the associated libraries as a hobby project or do you think that it will turn into a production ready tool set that people will use for shipping applications? - Tobias
  • IDEs like Android Studio and XCode have a lot of features that simplify the development and UI creation process. Do you have to forego those niceties when developing a mobile app in Python? - Tobias
  • Shipping Python applications is a problem that tends to pose a host of issues for people, which you are addressing with the Briefcase project. What are some of the biggest hurdles and design choices that you have encountered while working on that? - Tobias
  • Do you think that there will ever be a release of iOS or Android, or even a brand new mobile platform, that will ship with native Python support? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
26
Jun

Episode 63 - Armin Ronacher

Summary

Armin Ronacher is a prolific contributor to the Python software ecosystem, creating such widely used projects as Flask and Jinja2. This week we got the opportunity to talk to him about how he got his start with Python and what has inspired him to create the various tools that have made our lives easier. We also discussed his experiences working in Rust and how it can interface with Python.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Armin Ronacher about his contributions to the Python community.
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Interview with Armin Ronacher

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • What was the first open source project that you created in Python? - Tobias
  • What is your view of the responsibility for open source project maintainers and how do you manage a smooth handoff for projects that you no longer wish to be involved in? - Tobias
  • You have created a large number of successful open source libraries and tools during your career. What are some of the projects that may be less well known that you think people might find interesting? - Tobias (e.g. logbook)
  • I notice that you recently worked on the pipsi project. Please tell us about it! - Chris
  • Following on from the last question, where would you like to see the Python packaging infrastructure go in the future? - Chris
  • You have had some strong opinions of Python 2 vs Python 3. How has your position on that subject changed over time? - Tobias
  • Let's talk about Lektor - what differentiates it from the pack, and what keeps you coming back to CMS projects? - Chris
  • How has your blogging contributed to the work that you do and the success you have achieved? - Tobias
  • Lately you have been doing a fair amount of work with Rust. What was your reasoning for learning that language and how has it influenced your work with Python? - Tobias
  • In addition to the code you have written, you also helped to form the Pocoo organization. Can you explain what Pocoo is and what it does? What has inspired the rebranding to the Pallets project? - Tobias

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
18
Jun

Episode 62 - Bandit with Tim Kelsey, Travis McPeak, and Eric Brown

Summary

Making sure that your code is secure is a difficult task. In this episode we spoke to Eric Brown, Travis McPeak, and Tim Kelsey about their work on the Bandit library, which is a static analysis engine to help you find potential vulnerabilities before your application reaches production. We discussed how it works, how to make it fit your use case, and why it was created. Give the show a listen and then go start scanning your projects!

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project. And they just doubled the RAM for their introductory level servers, so that $20 will get you even more performance.
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Tim Kelsey and Eric Brown about Bandit which is a static analysis engine for finding security vulnerabilities in your Python code.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

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Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Interview with Eric Brown, Travis McPeak and Tim Kelsey

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • What is Bandit and what was the inspiration for creating it? - Tobias
  • How did you each get involved with the Bandit project? - Tobias
  • At what stage of the development process would you want to use Bandit? - Tobias
  • What kinds of analysis does Bandit do on the source code that it is run against? - Tobias
  • How does it determine whether a particular segment of code is introducing a vulnerability and what means does it use to determine the severity? - Tobias
  • What does the generated report include and what can be done with that information? - Tobias
  • What are some of the biggest design and implementation difficulties that have been encountered in the process of creating Bandit? - Tobias
  • How does bandit compare to similar tools in other languages such as Ruby's BrakeMan? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most interesting extensions that you have seen for Bandit? - Tobias
  • What is on the roadmap for the future of Bandit? - Tobias

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
12
Jun

Episode 61 - Sentry with David Cramer

Visit our site to listen to past episodes, support the show, join our community, and sign up for our mailing list.

Summary

As developers we all have to deal with bugs sometimes, but we don't have to make our users deal with them too. Sentry is a project that automatically detects errors in your applications and surfaces the necessary information to help you fix them quickly. In this episode we interviewed David Cramer about the history of Sentry and how he has built a team around it to provide a hosted offering of the open source project. We covered how the Sentry project got started, how it scales, and how to run a company based on open source.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show, subscribe, join our newsletter, check out the show notes, and get in touch you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!- Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing David Cramer about Sentry which is an open source and hosted service for capturing and tracking exceptions in your applications.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

sentry-horizontal-black.png

Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Interview with Firstname Lastname

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • What is Sentry and how did it get started? - Tobias
  • What led you to choose Python for writing Sentry and would you make the same choice again? - Tobias
  • Error reporting needs to be super light weight in order to be useful. What were some implementation challenges you faced around this issue? - Chris
  • Why would a developer want to use a project like Sentry and what makes it stand out from other offerings? - Tobias
  • When would someone want to use a different error tracking service? - Tobias
  • Can you describe the architecture of the Sentry project both in terms of the software design and the infrastructure necessary to run it? - Tobias
  • What made you choose Django versus another Python web framework, and would you choose it today? - Chris
  • What languages and platforms does Sentry support and how does a developer integrate it into their application? - Tobias
  • One of the big discussions in open source these days is around maintainability and a common approach is to have a hosted offering to pay the bills for keeping the project moving forward. How has your experience been with managing the open source community around the project in conjunction with providing a stable and reliable hosted service for it? - Tobias
  • Are there any benefits to using the hosted offering beyond the fact of not having to manage the service on your own? - Tobias
  • Have you faced any performance challenges implementing Sentry's server side? - Chris
  • What advice can you give to people who are trying to get the most utility out of their usage of Sentry? - Tobias
  • What kinds of challenges have you encountered in the process of adding support for such a wide variety of languages and runtimes? - Tobias
  • Capturing the context of an error can be immensely useful in finding and solving it effectively. Can you describe the facilities in Sentry and Raven that assist developers in providing that information? - Tobias
  • It's challenging to create an effective method for aggregating incoming issues so that they are sufficiently visible and useful while not hiding or discarding important information. Can you explain how you do that and what the evolution of that system has been like? - Tobias
  • I notice a lot of from future import in Sentry. Does it support Python 3 and/or what's the plan for getting there? - Chris
  • Looking back to the beginning of the project, what are some of the most interesting and surprising changes that have happened during its lifetime? How does it differ from its original vision? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
5
Jun

Episode 60 - Mercurial with Augie Fackler

Visit our site to listen to past episodes, support the show, join our community, and sign up for our mailing list.

Summary

As developers, one of the most important tools that we use daily is our version control system. Mercurial is one such tool that is written in Python, making it eminently flexible, customizable, and incredibly powerful. This week we spoke with Augie Fackler to learn about the history, features, and future of Mercurial.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Sentry this week. Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Check them out at getsentry.com and use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we're interviewing Augie Fackler about the Mercurial version control system
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

sentry-horizontal-black.png

Stop hoping your users will report bugs. Sentry's real-time tracking gives you insight into production deployments and information to reproduce and fix crashes. Use the code podcastinit at signup to get a $50 credit!

Interview with Augie Fackler

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • Can you describe what Mercurial is and how the project got started? - Tobias
  • How did you get involved with working on Mercurial? - Tobias
  • What are some of the features that can be found in Mercurial which are lacking in similar tools such as Git or Bazaar? - Tobias
  • One of the common complaints with Git is that its human interface could use some work. How is Mercurial's UX an improvement over Git? - Chris
  • For someone who is using Mercurial to work with a Git or other VCS repository, what are some of the edge cases that they should watch out for? Are there certain operations that could be performed in Mercurial which would break that compatibility layer? - Tobias
  • How is Mercurial architected and what are some of the design choices that allow for it to be so flexible and extensible? - Tobias
  • One of the core goals of Mercurial is for it to be safe. Can you explain what safety means in this context and how it is architected to achieve that goal? - Tobias
  • One of the noteworthy aspects of Mercurial is the strong focus on making extensions a first-class concern in the project, so much so that a number of the core functions are written as extensions. Can you describe why that is and how the extensions plug into the core execution engine? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most notable extensions that are available for use with Mercurial? - Tobias
  • For someone who is familiar with Git, what are some of the concepts that they would need to learn about in order to use Mercurial in an idiomatic way? - Tobias
  • A large part of the reason that Git has seen such large adoption is due to the prevalence of GitHub. There is the option of using BitBucket when using Mercurial. Are there any other noteworthy Mercurial hosting options? Do you think that the dearth of open source mercurial servers is partially due to the fact that Mercurial ships with a functional server built in? - Tobias
  • Can you share some of the most recent features that have been added to Mercurial? - Tobias
  • What do you have planned for the future of Mercurial? - Tobias
  • How do you think current day DVCS systems like Mercurial, Git and Darcs might evolve in the future? - Chris

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
28
May

Episode 59 - Pillow with Alex Clark

Visit our site to listen to past episodes, support the show, join our community, and sign up for our mailing list.

Summary

If you need to work with images the Pillow is the library to use. The Python Image Libary (PIL) has long been the gold standard for resizing, analyzing, and processing pictures in Python. Pillow is the modern fork that is bringing the PIL into the future so that we can all continue to use it moving forward. This week I spoke with Alex Clark about what first led him to fork the project and his experience maintaining it, including the migration to Python 3.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a new sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your host as usual is Tobias Macey
  • Today we're interviewing Alex Clark about the Pillow project
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Interview with Alex Clark

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Tobias
  • What were you working on that led you to forking the Python Image Library (PIL)? - Tobias
  • What does Fredrik Lundh (author of PIL) think of Pillow?
  • When you first forked the PIL project did you think that you would still be maintaining and updating that fork by now? - Tobias
  • Who else works on the project with you and how did they get involved? - Tobias
  • What kinds of special knowledge or experience have you found to be necessary for understanding and extending the routines in the library and for adding new capabilities? - Tobias
  • Can you describe what PIL and now Pillow are and what kinds of use cases they support? - Tobias
  • How does Pillow compare to libraries with a similar purpose such as ImageMagick? - Tobias
  • I have seen Pillow used in computer vision contexts. What are some of the capabilities of the library that lend themselves to this purpose? - Tobias
  • What architectural patterns does Pillow use to make image operations fast and flexible? Have you found the need to do any significant refactorings of the original code to make it compatible with modern uses and execution environments? - Tobias
  • Have you kept up to date with newer image formats, such as webp? Are there any image formats that Pillow does not support that you would like to see added to the project? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most interesting or innovative uses of Pillow that you have seen? - Tobias
  • What do you have planned for the future of Pillow? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
21
May

Episode 58 - Wagtail with Tom Dyson

Visit our site to sign up for the newsletter, explore past episodes, subscribe to the show, and help support our work.

Summary

If you are operating a website that needs to publish and manage content on a regular basis, a CMS (Content Management System) becomes the obvious choice for reducing your workload. There are a plethora of options available, but if you are looking for a solution that leverages the power of Python and exposes its flexibility then you should take a serious look at Wagtail. In this episode Tom Dyson explains how Wagtail came to be created, what sets it apart from other options, and when you should implement it for your projects.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We also have a new sponsor this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we are interviewing Tom Dyson about Wagtail, a modern and sophisticated CMS for Django.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Interview with Tom Dyson

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • Can you start by explaining what a content management system is and why they are useful? - Tobias
  • How did the Wagtail project get started and what makes it stand out from other comparable offerings? - Tobias
  • What made you choose Django as the basis for the project as opposed to another framework or language such as Pyramid, Flask, or Rails? - Tobias
  • What is your target user and are there any situations in which you would encourage someone to use a different CMS? - Tobias
  • Can you explain the software design approach that was taken with Wagtail and describe the challenges that have been overcome along the way? - Tobias
  • How did you approach the project in a way to make the CMS feel well integrated into the other apps in a given Django project so that it doesn't feel like an afterthought? - Tobias
  • For someone who wants to get started with using Wagtail, what does that experience look like? - Tobias
  • What are some of the features that are unique to Wagtail? - Tobias
  • Given that Wagtail is such a flexible tool, what are some of the gotchas that people should watch out for as they are working on a new site? - Tobias
  • Does Wagtail have any built-in support for multi-tenancy? - Tobias
  • Does Wagtail have a plugin system to allow developers to create extensions to the base CMS? - Tobias
  • Having built such a sizable plugin with deep integrations to Django, what are some of the shortcomings in the framework that you would like to see improved? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
14
May

Episode 57 - Buildbot with Pierre Tardy

Visit our site to listen to past episodes, support the show, join our community, and sign up for our mailing list.

Summary

As technology professionals, we need to make sure that the software we write is reliably bug free and the best way to do that is with a continuous integration and continuous deployment pipeline. This week we spoke with Pierre Tardy about Buildbot, which is a Python framework for building and maintaining CI/CD workflows to keep our software projects on track.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show, subscribe, join our newsletter, check out the show notes, and get in touch you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Rollbar this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we are interviewing Pierre Tardy about the Buildbot continuous integration system.
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Interview with Pierre Tardy

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • For anyone who isn't familiar with it can you explain what Buildbot is? - Tobias
  • What was the original inspiration for creating the project? - Tobias
  • How did you get involved in the project? - Tobias
  • Can you describe the internal architecture of Buildbot and outline how a typical workflow would look? - Tobias
  • There are a number of packages out on PyPI for doing subprocess invocation and control, in addition to the functions in the standard library. Which does buildbot use and why? - Chris
  • What makes Buildbot stand out from other CI/CD options that are available today? - Tobias
  • Scaling a large CI/CD system can become a challenge. What are some of the limiting factors in the Buildbot architecture and in what ways have you seen people work to overcome them? - Tobias
  • Are there any design or architecture choices that you would change in the project if you were to start it over? - Tobias
  • If you were starting from scratch on implementing buildbot today, would you still use Python? Why? - Chris
  • What are some of the most difficult challenges that have been faced in the creation and evolution of the project? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most notable uses of Buildbot and how do they uniquely leverage the capabilities of the framework? - Tobias
  • What are some of the biggest challenges that people face when beginning to implement Buildbot in their architecture? - Tobias
  • Does buildbot support the use of docker or public clouds as a part of the build process? - Chris
  • I know that the execution engine for Buildbot is written in Twisted. What benefits does that provide and how has that influenced any efforts for providing Python 3 support? - Tobias
  • Does buildbot support build parallelization at all? For instance splitting one very long test run up into 3 instances each running a section of tests to cut build time? - Chris
  • What are some of the most requested features for the project and are there any that would be unreasonably difficult to implement due to the current design of the project? - Tobias
  • Does buildbot offer a plugin system like Jenkins does, or is there some other approach it uses for custom extensions to the base buildbot functionality? - Chris
  • Managing a reliable build pipeline can be operationally challenging. What are some of the thorniest problems for Buildbot in this regard and what are some of the mechanisms that are built in to simplify the operational characteristics? - Tobias
  • What were some of the challenges around supporting slaves running on platforms with very different environmental characteristics like Microsoft Windows? - Chris
  • What is on the roadmap for Buildbot? - Tobias

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00
7
May

Episode 56 - Onion IoT with Lazar and Zheng

Visit our site to listen to past episodes, support the show, join our community, and sign up for our mailing list.

Summary

One of the biggest new trends in technology is the Internet of Things and one of the driving forces is the wealth of new sensors and platforms that are being continually introduced. In this episode we spoke with the founder and head engineer of one such platform named Onion. The Omega board is a new hardware platform that runs OpenWRT and lets you configure it using a number of languages, not least of which is Python.

Brief Introduction

  • Hello and welcome to Podcast.__init__, the podcast about Python and the people who make it great.
  • I would like to thank everyone who has donated to the show. Your contributions help us make the show sustainable. For details on how to support the show you can visit our site at pythonpodcast.com
  • Linode is sponsoring us this week. Check them out at linode.com/podcastinit and get a $20 credit to try out their fast and reliable Linux virtual servers for your next project
  • We are also sponsored by Rollbar this week. Rollbar is a service for tracking and aggregating your application errors so that you can find and fix the bugs in your application before your users notice they exist. Use the link rollbar.com/podcastinit to get 90 days and 300,000 errors for free on their bootstrap plan.
  • Visit our site to subscribe to our show, sign up for our newsletter, read the show notes, and get in touch.
  • To help other people find the show you can leave a review on iTunes, or Google Play Music, and tell your friends and co-workers
  • Join our community! Visit discourse.pythonpodcast.com for your opportunity to find out about upcoming guests, suggest questions, and propose show ideas.
  • The Open Data Science Conference in Boston is happening on May 21st and 22nd. If you use the code EP during registration you will save 20% off of the ticket price. If you decide to attend then let us know, we'll see you there!
  • Your hosts as usual are Tobias Macey and Chris Patti
  • Today we are interviewing Lazar and Zheng about the Onion IoT platform
Linode Sponsor Banner

Use the promo code podcastinit20 to get a $20 credit when you sign up!

Rollbar Logo

I’m excited to tell you about a new sponsor of the show, Rollbar.

One of the frustrating things about being a developer, is dealing with errors… (sigh)

  • Relying on users to report errors
  • Digging thru log files trying to debug issues
  • A million alerts flooding your inbox ruining your day...

With Rollbar’s full-stack error monitoring, you get the context, insights and control you need to find and fix bugs faster. It's easy to get started tracking the errors and exceptions in your stack.You can start tracking production errors and deployments in 8 minutes - or less, and Rollbar works with all major languages and frameworks, including Ruby, Python, Javascript, PHP, Node, iOS, Android and more.You can integrate Rollbar into your existing workflow such as sending error alerts to Slack or Hipchat, or automatically create new issues in Github, JIRA, Pivotal Tracker etc.

We have a special offer for Podcast.__init__ listeners. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit, signup, and get the Bootstrap Plan free for 90 days. That's 300,000 errors tracked for free.Loved by developers at awesome companies like Heroku, Twilio, Kayak, Instacart, Zendesk, Twitch and more. Help support Podcast.__init__ and give Rollbar a try a today. Go to rollbar.com/podcastinit

Interview with Lazar and Zheng

  • Introductions
  • How did you get introduced to Python? - Chris
  • What is the Onion platform and how does it leverage Python? - Tobias
  • Can you compare and contrast the Python support you provide for Onion as compared with Raspberry Pi? - Chris
  • I noticed that you are using the OpenWRT distribution of Linux in order to provide support for multiple languages. What was the driving intent behind choosing it and why is multiple language support so important for an IoT product? - Tobias
  • Do you provide any libraries for using with the Omega to abstract away some of the hardware level tasks? What are some of the design considerations that were involved when developing that? - Tobias
  • What are some of the most interesting projects you have seen people build with Python on your platform? - Tobias

Keep In Touch

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The intro and outro music is from Requiem for a Fish The Freak Fandango Orchestra / CC BY-SA

00:0000:00